Rage3D Discussion Area

Rage3D Discussion Area (http://www.rage3d.com/board/index.php)
-   General Hardware (http://www.rage3d.com/board/forumdisplay.php?f=11)
-   -   Edge Router Lite- Very Basic Tutorial. (http://www.rage3d.com/board/showthread.php?t=34031239)

t0adp1p3 Oct 30, 2016 10:18 AM

Edge Router Lite- Very Basic Tutorial.
 
I saw some people were interested in the Ubiquiti Edge Router Lite (ERLite‑3). I wrote a guide for anyone who decides to pick one up to beef up there network. THe initial setup can be daunting, since most of the guides are written by network people and not normal people who are coming from Asus/Netgear/Linksys consumer routers. This guide is very basic, and assumes you know nothing. Hope it helps someone.

Setting up the UBIQUITI EDGE ROUTER LITE for people who don’t do this for a living.

Part 1 – getting all the initial stuff downloaded and/or bought.

We will start off by grabbing all the stuff we need to get the router going with your network and PC. I am on Windows 10 64 bit, and I wrote this accordingly. Also, I knew absolutely zero about networking when I bought this thing (and still don't but hey I got it working). This is the guide I wish I would have had when I started it would have saved me some time. It’s really not that daunting, and anyone can get this thing running.

The first 3 things we need are located at https://www.ubnt.com/download/edgema...r-lite/erlite3

1. EdgeOS User Guide: (The Manual)
https://www.ubnt.com/downloads/guide.../EdgeOS_UG.pdf
2. EdgeRouter ERLite-3/ERPoe-5 Firmware v1.9.0: (The latest Firmware)
https://www.ubnt.com/download/edgema...firmware-v190#
3. ER-e100.v1.6.0.4716006.tar: (Old version 1.6 of the firmware found by clicking “See Past Firmware)
https://www.ubnt.com/download/edgema...1604716006tar#

We are also going to grab a config file from the small net builder site to get us jumpstarted. Thanks to Tim Higgins for writing the article. Also, those forums and that site is awesome with some helpful folks.
The article in question is here:
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwa...dgerouter-lite
It’s a pretty old article from January 2013 using some OG firmware (1.2) that I think still ships installed on these things (I bought my ERL-3 in Oct of 2016 and it came with the 1.2 firmware). So we are gonna grab the config file ubnt_erl_2lan_w_dhcp.tar.gz
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/mydow..._w_dhcp.tar.gz


Next we will need a SSH and Telnet program for Windows and Unix platforms, along with an xterm terminal emulator (all that was just the description for one program PuTTy). We will also grab a windows console enhancement (ConEmu).
1. First on our list is PuTTY: a free SSH and Telnet client located here:
http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~s.../download.html
Grab PuTTy.exe for x86 if you are on windows: https://the.earth.li/~sgtatham/putty.../x86/putty.exe
2. Next up is ConEmu a Windows console window enhancement located here:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/conemu/
Grab ConEmuPack from the link at the top: https://sourceforge.net/projects/con...atest/download


I also ordered a USB to Serial / Rs232 Console Rollover Cable. I picked up this one from Amazon:
Asunflower Ftdi USB to Serial / Rs232 Console Rollover Cable for Cisco Routers - Rj45
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Price: $14.99
I will be honest; you don’t need one of these. Maybe if you are a network dude who does this stuff for a living it would be helpful, but it is just another way of getting to the CLI (Command Line interface) on the router. There are two other ways that don’t require the cable, and are just as easy and effective. I think the only advantage of this one is it saves you from rebooting the router as often or something. Anyway, I bought one anyway just to try it out and mess around with it. Seriously, you do not need this at all. Only pick one up if you want to try it out for some odd reason.

You also need some Cat5 or Cat6 cable. I grabbed these from amazon:
Cable Matters 160021 5-Feet Cat6 Snagless Ethernet Patch Cable, Pack of 5 (Black/ Blue/ White/ Red/ Green)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I paid $9.99, they were on sale for 50% off. I have a sneaky suspicion that they are always 50% off. They had like 1600 reviews and were rated 5 stars, so why not.

t0adp1p3 Oct 30, 2016 10:19 AM

Part 2- unboxing it.

First off this thing is a little different then consumer routers you are probably used to from ASUS, Netgear, or Linksys. You can’t just plug it in, hook it up to your PC and bam off to the races. Nope, you got to do a whole bunch of stuff first. Let’s take a look at it and see what the ports and orifices are.

Back of the router has a place to plug in the power adapter and a place to ground it if you want. I think it is already internally grounded, so if this is just going on a shelf or whatever don’t worry about it. If your place gets hit by lightning, it will probably fry it, but other than that you will be fine. If that does happen, I am sure you can rebuild after that $90 loss….

Here is the power cord that plugs into the back of the router. Assuming you are older than 2, That was probably unnecessary to explain, but I did it anyway.

Front of the router has from left to right: a port for hooking up a console connector (that would be where that weird Asunflower Ftdi USB to Serial / Rs232 Console Rollover Cable I mentioned earlier goes) and 3 Ethernet ports. These Ethernet ports can be assigned different functions so that is why they are not labeled WAN and LAN 1, Lan 2 etc... Anyway, the 0,1,2 ports are where you eventually plug the Cat5 or 6 cable into.

Part 3- Assigning a static IP
First thing we have to do is assign a static IP to the network adapter on your PC or we can’t do anything really, so let’s do that. Here are the steps with pictures on how to do it
1. Go to the control panel and click on “Network and Internet”

2. Now click on “Network and Sharing Center”

3. Click on “Change adapter settings”

4. Right click on your network adapter and select properties


6. Scroll down and select Internet Protocol Version 4(TCP/IPv4) and select properties. Now here is where we actually assign it a static ip. Select use the following IP address and make it 192.168.1.100, the gateway should auto fill in with 255.255.255.0 or you can add it. Also while you are at it, I guess make google the DNS thingy buy selecting Use the following DNS server adresses, and setting them to 8.8.8.8 (preferred) and 8.8.4.4 (alternate). Hit OK and you are done.


Ok now we can move on to plugging things in and getting going.

t0adp1p3 Oct 30, 2016 10:20 AM

Part 4- Logging in and Changing the password.

1. Plug the power cord into the back of the router.
2. Plug a Cat5 or 6 cord into the Ethernet port labeled 0 on the front of the router. (You could probably use 1 or 2 as well, but let’s not get fancy).
3. Plug the other end of the aCat5/6 cable into your Ethernet adapter on your PC.
4. Open a web browser in the address bar type 192.168.1.1 and hit enter.
5. You should now be greeted with a log on screen, type “ubnt” without the quotes for username and password.

6. You should now be on the Dashboard screen of the EdgeOs at the top right is a tab called users. Click it

7. We should now be on the users screen where we can change the username and password. Let’s do that first. We have to add a new user then delete the old one. So click add user

8. Now we will fill in the Create New Local User Box. Fill in whatever you want for user name and password and hit save.

9. Now your back on the Users screen click the actions dropdown for the old default ubnt user and select delete.


Alright we are done with part 4, now we are going to load that config file from the nice folks at Small Net Builder.

Part 5- Loading a config, so we can use this thing
You are probably wondering why we are going to load an old configuration form an article in 2013. Well, when I tried this router initially I decided to update the router firmware from a local file using the EdgeOs web interface. Every time I tried it would give an error. So Naturally I googled the error and quite a few people had the issue as well. So I figured this method out as a workaround. You are more than welcome to just go ahead and try and update to the 1.9 firmware from the system screen and skip all this if you wish. It is basically the same as part 6.
1. From the dashboard screen (or any screen really), go to the bottom left corner and click “System”

You will be greeted with the system screen where you can change some stuff and update firmware and upload configuration files. So lets upload a configuration file that will make Ethernet port 0 the WAN port. In addition, it will make Ethernet port 1 a LAN port, and Ethernet port 2 a LAN port as well. Ports 1 and 2 will not be bridged they will be separate networks. You can bridge them later if you like through the wizards (keep in mind when you bridge them it will turn off hardware offload, and the router will max out around 200Mbps. If your internet connection is 200Mbps or less line that is fine, if it is higher though then leave them unbridged so this thing can fly.
2. Scroll down until you find the configuration and management part of the screen, under restore config select upload, point it to the ubnt_erl_2lan_w_dhcp.tar.gz file we downloaded earlier from small net builder and click open. The router taks a few to update.

3. Ok now scroll down further until you see restart & shutdown router. Restart it.

4. OK, hopefully we did things right. So now we can change some plugs around and hook this up to the internet. Take the Cat5/6 cable from your modem and plug it into the Eth0 port on the front of the router (it is now the WAN port thanks to the config file we just loaded). Plug a Cat5/6 cable from the Eth1 port which is now a LAN port (you could probably use the Eth2 port if you wanted, but once again let’s keep it simple) and plug the other end into your network card on your PC.
5. Restart your pc and router, open your browser and you should have internet. You might get an error from windows, you can let it auto fix your net adapter or you can go back in and undo the static ip we set earlier from your pc. Windows has no problem doing this for you if you let it. If not, just make the adapter look like this and you should be fine.

t0adp1p3 Oct 30, 2016 10:21 AM

Part 6- updating the firmware

So right now, the router is working, but the EdgeOs is running on some old firmware. So, we are going to update it to the latest build 1.9. A couple of caveats though: 1. The router has enough room for I believe 2 versions of the firmware. And 2. I think it has issues going from 1.2 straight to 1.9, so we will first install firmware 1.6, then install 1.9.
1. Log into the browser and go to 192.168.1.1.
2. Log in with the username and password you made.
3. Go to the system page.
4. Scroll down until you get to the upgrade system image portion, click upload a file, find the image called ER-e100.v1.6.0.4716006.tar that we downloaded earlier, and click open.

5. I believe the router will reboot, if not reboot it.
6. Upon reboot we should be on version 1.6 of EdgeOs.
7. Repeat steps 1 though 5, but on step 4 select the 1.9 firmware. ER-e100.v1.9.0.4901118.tar
8. Now you are on version 1.9


NOTE- Part 6 may or may not work. The router is really finicky when it comes to the initial update from 1.2 for some reason. So, part 8 is going to be about how to make it work via the CLI (command line interface). Part 7 is going to be about how to log into the CLI by various methods.
However, if part 6 did work for you, then you can skip straight to part 9 which will have us set up the router with wizards and enable uPNP.
I will say that if you are interested, part 7 is still useful to show you how to log into the CLI. A lot of the tutorials and guides on the internet use the CLI.

t0adp1p3 Oct 30, 2016 10:21 AM

Part 7- The CLI and logging into it.
Note-if part 6 worked for you or you already know how to log into the CLI you can skip this step.
I am going to cover 3 methods for logging into the CLI. They are via the Web GUI EdgeOS, via SSH using PuTTy, and via Serial with PuTTy.

Logging into the CLI using the Web GUI.
1. Open your web browser
2. Enter 192.168.1.1
3. Enter your username and password
4. In the very top right of the Web GUI, click CLI.

5. Tada! You should have a console now for the CLI that looks like this (you can go to part 8 or 9 now if that is good enough for you.)


Before we move onto Logging into the CLI using SSH. Let’s install PuTTy and ConEmu.

Installing ConEmu and PuTTy.
1. Download ConEmu and Putty (we did this in part 1), and extract the contents to a folder. I named my folder Putty and it looks like this after extraction:

2. Open up ConEmu64, go to settings (I think via right click), go to the startup settings on the right labeled “Startup”. Under startup options, select specified named task, and select {putty}.


Setup PuTTy for SSH. Skip this if you don’t want to do SSH
1. Open Putty by clicking Putty.exe
2. It should open to a screen called Session, if not click session.
3. Under connection type select SSH.
4. Under host name and port put 192.168.1.1 and port 22
5. Under saved sessions type in SSH-ERL-3 or whatever you want to name it and hit save.
6. Should look like this:


Setup PuTTy for Serial. Skip this if you don’t want to use that funky rollover cord.
1. Open Putty by clicking Putty.exe
2. On the left side where it says Category: select Serial under connection
3. Where it says Serial Line to connect to select COM3 (this might be different for you, we can check later). Speed is 115200, Data Bits 8, Stop Bits 1, Parity None, Flow Control None.

4. Now go to session. And select Serial
5. Under saved sessions type in ERL-3 or whatever you want to call it and hit save. Looks like this:


OK now Putty is setup and ConEmu is setup. You can pin ConEmu to your start if you want. One last thing to do now, which can be skipped if you didn’t buy that funky rollover cord. We will get the cord working, and it isn’t really intuitive. So let’s do it.

Setting up the Asunflower Ftdi USB to Serial / Rs232 Console Rollover Cable.

1. Plug the Non USB end of the cord ( I am sure it has a name, and I wish I cared enough to know what it is) into the Console port on the left side of the front of the router. Plug the USB end into a USB port on your PC.
2. You’d think that would be enough, but it aint. So go to Device Manager. You should see something labeled ft232r usb uart that isn’t working correctly. So lets get drivers for it.
3. Go to http://www.ftdichip.com/Drivers/VCP.htm and grab the drivers for windows. There is a setup executable on the page, just grab that one http://www.ftdichip.com/Drivers/CDM/CDM21224_Setup.zip
4. Install the drivers.
5. You should now have a device under Ports (Com&LPT) called USB serial port (Com3). It might be a diferent com port, if it is change the com port in putty to what it is. Anyway, we have to set up this USB serial port now to work with the modem.

6. Right click on it and go to properties>Port Settings. Set up the Bits per second to 115200, data bits to 8, parity none, stop bits 1, and flow control None.

7. Voila it is set up now.

Now we can show how to log into the CLI using Putty either via SSH or Serial.

Logging into the CLI with PuTTy.
1. SSH:
2. Open ConEmu.
3. When Putty opens Load SSH-ERL-3
4. Click Open

You should be greeted with a login screen. Type in your username and password. And now you are at the CLI for EdgeOS. For more info on the CLI, read the documentation or google EdgeRouter setup. There are several articles and blogs on getting started with it. Also the Ubnt forums are available.

Logging into the CLI with PuTTy.
1. Serial:
2. Open ConEmu.
3. When Putty opens Load ERL-3
4. Click Open

You should be greeted with a login screen. Even if not greeted with a log in prompt: Type in your username and password. And now you are at the CLI for EdgeOS. For more info on the CLI, read the documentation or google EdgeRouter setup. There are several articles and blogs on getting started with it. Also the Ubnt forums are available.

t0adp1p3 Oct 30, 2016 10:22 AM

Part 8 – updating firmware via the CLI and deleting the old firmware.
Ok now we know how to get into the CLI by whatever method we wanted. Now we are going to update the firmware via the CLI and delete the old firmware. If you already managed to get firmware 1.9 working you can skip this and go to part 9.
Log in to the CLI
Look at what this website tells you. Seriously, it is explained pretty decently there.
https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/artic...dgeOS-firmware

Part 9 -the wizards
Log into the WebGui
Go to wizards in the upper right corner.

I personally use basic setup and have it set like this:


I also go to feature wizards for uPNP and have it set like this

Reboot the router and done.

Conclusion:

There is a lot the router can do, and there are some smart people out there who will help you do those things if you wish to learn how to do them. This guide however is for those of us who are not so smart, and just at least want to get it up and running. Hopefully this helps, but consider looking at the following for more info:

badsykes Oct 30, 2016 12:54 PM

Kudos for taking time to write this... +1

Greasy Oct 30, 2016 01:24 PM

Thanks for sharing this man. Have you noticed any improvements over your old router so far?

t0adp1p3 Oct 30, 2016 04:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Greasy (Post 1337914204)
Thanks for sharing this man. Have you noticed any improvements over your old router so far?


My network was pretty dated before running a ASUS RTN66U from 2012.

I am still on 350/25 cable(fiber is still being ran), so the speed itself on speed tests is the same.

On the other hand, it feels more capable now. We used to have stuff buffer periodically when we were streaming too many things at once. Now it all just works really well. I have 2 girls who stream netflix/hulu/hbo/stars/amazon whatever practically non-stop, my wife either streaming a movie or doing something on her phone or tablet, I am usually playing a online game or downloading something. Now we have Cat6 ran to the TV,Roku,PS4, Cable Box, PC, media server , and to 2 wireless APs, and everything just works no hiccups in video or anything at all.

I wish I was more knowledgeable to give you a better answer than that, but thats is all I can say about it. I dont know what kind of tests to run to test it.

badsykes Oct 31, 2016 01:30 AM

I have 300mbps down/100mbps up on a Tp-link 1043nd gigabit
So you say that the Ubiquiti feels more capable in simultaneous clients ?
The Asus RTN66U was not a cheap toy either...
Looking at power cord it looks like an EU one for 220v... ? Are you trasitioning to 220v and "EU" power cord style ?
In UK i needed a converter to connect EU stuff to UK power outlets.

aviphysics Oct 31, 2016 11:00 AM

Is there a substantial point to one of these if you only have 100 Mb/s symmetric?

Right now I am using the ASUS router that T-Mobile hands out at my family's home and an Archer C8 at my weekday commuter residence. The bandwidth benchmarks suggest my PC is seeing pretty close to the provider specifications.

At my family's home, we don't seem to have those buffering problems. At my weekday residence, Comcast sometimes takes a dive, but the community forums seem to suggest that is a provider issue (I.e. a number of homes all get hit at once.)

t0adp1p3 Oct 31, 2016 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aviphysics (Post 1337914469)
Is there a substantial point to one of these if you only have 100 Mb/s symmetric?

Right now I am using the ASUS router that T-Mobile hands out at my family's home and an Archer C8 at my weekday commuter residence. The bandwidth benchmarks suggest my PC is seeing pretty close to the provider specifications.

At my family's home, we don't seem to have those buffering problems. At my weekday residence, Comcast sometimes takes a dive, but the community forums seem to suggest that is a provider issue (I.e. a number of homes all get hit at once.)


If you are happy with what you have,and it works don't fix it.

t0adp1p3 Oct 31, 2016 04:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by badsykes (Post 1337914355)
I have 300mbps down/100mbps up on a Tp-link 1043nd gigabit
So you say that the Ubiquiti feels more capable in simultaneous clients ?
The Asus RTN66U was not a cheap toy either...
Looking at power cord it looks like an EU one for 220v... ? Are you trasitioning to 220v and "EU" power cord style ?
In UK i needed a converter to connect EU stuff to UK power outlets.

I just grabbed that pic from the net, the plug looks similar to that but has a standard end like we use in the US.

And yeah the RTN66U was nice, but i have really thick walls, and couldn't get WiFi from it upstairs. I also can't run CAT cable upstairs. So I looked around and read up and decided to go with a mesh WiFi system. The best one available by far was the Orbi, but the actual non-wireless router part of it, I wasn't sure could handle gigabit internet. So I needed a separate router for that part fo the network, while using the Orbi as AP's. The Edgerouter lite was talked about alot as being phenomenal for $99, so I got it.

Plus you know how it is, sometimes you just want to try out something different, and learn something. I'm learning about stuff I never gave a though about to be honest, and I want to learn more. I am actually thinking of getting this when we move into our new home now.

Shadowless Nov 1, 2016 09:46 AM

I'm assuming you can configure the interfaces to traverse traffic between them?

curio Nov 1, 2016 01:37 PM

Wow t0adp1p3 excellent write-up; thank you for taking the time to do this

Let me know if you want this thread stickied

badsykes Nov 1, 2016 01:45 PM

I would buy the Edge lite router for the sake of having new stuff.I put energy in other directions than networking and IT.
It will be more challenging to replace the 1043nd and more expensive.With 1043nd and openwrt it covers all house.
On the other hand in ubiquiti i can have a combination that is like an Edge Router 5 POE and a cheapest roud AP so to use a single power socket...

wazman Nov 1, 2016 07:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by curio (Post 1337914932)
Wow t0adp1p3 excellent write-up; thank you for taking the time to do this

Let me know if you want this thread stickied

I vote for a sticky. I wish more guides were written this well.

Shadowless Nov 2, 2016 08:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by badsykes (Post 1337914936)
I would buy the Edge lite router for the sake of having new stuff.I put energy in other directions than networking and IT.
It will be more challenging to replace the 1043nd and more expensive.With 1043nd and openwrt it covers all house.
On the other hand in ubiquiti i can have a combination that is like an Edge Router 5 POE and a cheapest roud AP so to use a single power socket...

Another thing is if you use all Ubiquiti products you can manage them all using the Unifi management suite. IMO having centralized management is very enticing.

Quote:

Originally Posted by wazman (Post 1337915028)
I vote for a sticky. I wish more guides were written this well.

I second this.

Mahjik Nov 2, 2016 10:28 AM

This is a good write-up. One other thing that could be useful is to post links or similar write-ups for ISP specific integrations with this device. I know there is one for this router and Google Fiber, as I was attempting to go that route. Some of those other write-ups include scripts that can setup the router via the CLI.

curio Nov 2, 2016 11:27 AM

Thread stickied. OP if you object, just let me know.

Mahjik Nov 2, 2016 12:04 PM

Here's a link for using an Edge Router Lite with Google Fiber (v1 hardware):

http://www.stevejenkins.com/blog/201...gerouter-lite/

t0adp1p3 Nov 2, 2016 04:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by curio (Post 1337914932)
Wow t0adp1p3 excellent write-up; thank you for taking the time to do this

Let me know if you want this thread stickied

Quote:

Originally Posted by wazman (Post 1337915028)
I vote for a sticky. I wish more guides were written this well.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mahjik (Post 1337915194)
This is a good write-up. One other thing that could be useful is to post links or similar write-ups for ISP specific integrations with this device. I know there is one for this router and Google Fiber, as I was attempting to go that route. Some of those other write-ups include scripts that can setup the router via the CLI.

thanks.

t0adp1p3 Nov 2, 2016 05:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mahjik (Post 1337915230)
Here's a link for using an Edge Router Lite with Google Fiber (v1 hardware):

http://www.stevejenkins.com/blog/201...gerouter-lite/

Nice, he also has a version up on github for the 1.9 firmware
https://gist.github.com/stevejenkins...1c9f840e06d508

Shadowless Nov 3, 2016 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mahjik (Post 1337915194)
This is a good write-up. One other thing that could be useful is to post links or similar write-ups for ISP specific integrations with this device. I know there is one for this router and Google Fiber, as I was attempting to go that route. Some of those other write-ups include scripts that can setup the router via the CLI.

A bunch of the bigger cable ISPs like Optimum, TWC, Comcast, don't require any specific WAN settings. Just turn on DHCP on your WAN interface and you're good to go.

Mahjik Nov 3, 2016 05:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadowless (Post 1337915695)
A bunch of the bigger cable ISPs like Optimum, TWC, Comcast, don't require any specific WAN settings. Just turn on DHCP on your WAN interface and you're good to go.

I'm well aware. However, it can become an issue if the service is also providing TV (this is where most have issues). I had no problems routing standard internet traffic, but I wasn't able to get the TV traffic routed.

SimonCIon Nov 3, 2016 11:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadowless (Post 1337915159)
Another thing is if you use all Ubiquiti products you can manage them all using the Unifi management suite. IMO having centralized management is very enticing.

Devices that run on EdgeMAX (of which the EdgeRouter Lite is one) cannot be managed by UniFi.

t0adp1p3: I don't see anywhere where you turn hardware offload _on_. Not in that sample config, and not anywhere in your instructions. Offload is off by default on the ERL ($DEITY only knows why!), and -if it's off- the absolute best you'll see out of the device is 200mbit/s. So, you might wanna explicitly add an instruction somewhere in your writeup that suggests turning on offload for IPv4 and IPv6 forwarding and VLAN.

I'm also not sure that it's still true that bridged interfaces are not offloaded. IIRC (and I may not RC), the 5-port EdgeRouter ships with four bridged ports.

SimonCIon Nov 3, 2016 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mahjik (Post 1337916024)
I'm well aware. However, it can become an issue if the service is also providing TV (this is where most have issues). I had no problems routing standard internet traffic, but I wasn't able to get the TV traffic routed.

Get to Tier 2 tech support and ask what VLAN settings are required to let your cable provider's IPTV box do what it needs to do.

t0adp1p3 Nov 4, 2016 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SimonCIon (Post 1337916208)
Devices that run on EdgeMAX (of which the EdgeRouter Lite is one) cannot be managed by UniFi.

t0adp1p3: I don't see anywhere where you turn hardware offload _on_. Not in that sample config, and not anywhere in your instructions. Offload is off by default on the ERL ($DEITY only knows why!), and -if it's off- the absolute best you'll see out of the device is 200mbit/s. So, you might wanna explicitly add an instruction somewhere in your writeup that suggests turning on offload for IPv4 and IPv6 forwarding and VLAN.

I'm also not sure that it's still true that bridged interfaces are not offloaded. IIRC (and I may not RC), the 5-port EdgeRouter ships with four bridged ports.

Hardware offload is On by default not off by default for the ERL. Bridging the ERL disables hardware offload. I am not sure about the 5 port edgerouter, because I did not buy one.

Anyway, you can check it by going to the CLI and typing:
show ubnt offload

You can see the services I am using are offloaded, with no need to turn it On.


and they haven't finished installing fiber yet, but here is the TWC ultimate 300 running on it just fine.


Mahjik Nov 4, 2016 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SimonCIon (Post 1337916210)
Get to Tier 2 tech support and ask what VLAN settings are required to let your cable provider's IPTV box do what it needs to do.

They won't provide that information as there is no support for using anything other than their own hardware (in which case, there is no need to know that information).

SimonCIon Nov 4, 2016 02:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916262)
Hardware offload is On by default not off by default for the ERL.

Odd. Maybe I purchased an ERL that had an even _older_ version of EdgeMAX than yours did, but I _absolutely_ know that -out of the box- hardware offload was _disabled_. An Ars Technica recently ran a piece that mentioned that hardware offload was disabled out-of-the-box on the ERL as of a couple of years ago: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/...r-competition/ (search for "This didn't surprise me, because that was about what I saw out of Apache tests".)

Would you mind adding a couple of sentences somewhere that at least _mention_ that offload might be disabled, and mention how to enable it if it is disabled?

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916262)
Anyway, you can check it by going to the CLI and typing:
show ubnt offload

Or by going into configure mode and doing
show system offload
;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mahjik (Post 1337916433)
They won't provide that information as there is no support for using anything other than their own hardware (in which case, there is no need to know that information).

And the smallnetbuilder and dslreports forums are filled with anecdata that disagrees with you. It never hurts to ask around. :)

Mahjik Nov 4, 2016 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SimonCIon (Post 1337916504)
And the smallnetbuilder and dslreports forums are filled with anecdata that disagrees with you. It never hurts to ask around. :)

It's actually easier just to get pcap data at the router and see what's trying to come in. However, that's essentially what people have already done which is why I suggested linking to those write-ups.

t0adp1p3 Nov 4, 2016 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SimonCIon (Post 1337916504)
Odd. Maybe I purchased an ERL that had an even _older_ version of EdgeMAX than yours did, but I _absolutely_ know that -out of the box- hardware offload was _disabled_. An Ars Technica recently ran a piece that mentioned that hardware offload was disabled out-of-the-box on the ERL as of a couple of years ago: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/...r-competition/ (search for "This didn't surprise me, because that was about what I saw out of Apache tests".)

Would you mind adding a couple of sentences somewhere that at least _mention_ that offload might be disabled, and mention how to enable it if it is disabled?



Or by going into configure mode and doing
show system offload
;)



And the smallnetbuilder and dslreports forums are filled with anecdata that disagrees with you. It never hurts to ask around. :)


Ars ran the USG in that article I believe , not the same router... . anyhoo I believe it was changed/added back in like 1.6 of the firmware for the ERL (seems to be what UBNT says), so maybe that is why you and ars remember the good old days of turning it on...anyway the ERL is on by default, but this stuff turns it off

Ethernet Bridging (using ports on the EdgeRouter as a switch)
Ethernet Bonding (also called port-channeling by Cisco or trunking by HP)
Tunnel encapsulation (GRE offload support is coming in 1.7 though)
Quality of Service (QoS)
Policy Routing (in 1.7 this is improved as the existance of a MODIFY rule will no longer disable offload)
Unicast Reverse Path Filtering (uRPF)
5-tuple packet filtering (I think).
Netflow
Port Mirroring

Hard to find a full list, but that is what some people have discovered so far.

Anyway here is a UBNT article on how to disable it (because it is on by default....). And on the chance someone decides to do that for some reason, they provide a how to turn it back on....

https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/artic...-acceleration-

set system offload ipsec enable
set system offload ipv4 forwarding enable
set system offload ipv4 pppoe enable
set system offload ipv4 vlan enable
set system offload ipv6 forwarding enable
set system offload ipv6 pppoe disable
set system offload ipv6 vlan enable
Some features cause hardware offloading to be disabled.


I will add it in a few to the main guide though.

SimonCIon Nov 4, 2016 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916582)
Ars ran the USG in that article I believe , not the same router...

True. They did, and it's not. However, if you read the article and search for the string that I provided, you'll see that -as I said-, the author is speaking about the ERL. :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916582)
...anyhoo I believe it was changed/added back in like 1.6 of the firmware for the ERL...

I don't see that in the release notes: https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeMA...0/ba-p/1086373

And I was using the 1.6.0 betas because at the time I purchased the router it was the only easy way to get DHCPv6-PD support.

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916582)
...anyway the ERL is on by default, but this stuff turns it off...

Yeah, I'm doing _none_ of that and (aside from flirting with NetFlow a year after I got the router) have never done any of that.

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916582)
I will add it in a few to the main guide though.

Thanks! A quick mention of:
* why enabling offload is a good idea
* the steps to check to see if offload is enabled
* the steps to activate it
would be quite enough.

t0adp1p3 Nov 4, 2016 08:59 PM

"As of v1.6.0 EdgeOS now supports hw offload for:

IPv4 forwarding
IPv4 vlan
IPv4 PPPoE
IPv6 forwarding
IPv6 vlan
IPv6 PPPoE"

https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/artic...-acceleration-


and darn near every single post or review or guide states hardware offload is on by default.

t0adp1p3 Nov 5, 2016 10:07 AM

ERL TUTORIAL FOR BEGINNERS Continued:

I will keep adding parts tp the tutorial. I will cover the following stuff I ran into setting the router up in the hopes it will help someone.:
  • Hardware Offload (How to turn it OFF and ON, and how to verify it is ON). This is basically to make sure your router is capable of achieving the speed you need it to.
  • In the Web GUI for EdgeOS we will assign static addresses to clients on your local network (this will be useful for when we setup a vpn later)
  • Setting up the router to update a dynamic DNS service. This is useful if you have services that rely on your PC/Router having a static IP, but you actually have a dynamic IP.
  • Setting up the router to work with PLEX. For some reason, I had issues with the ports PLEX uses, so I step through opening the ports.
  • Setting up the router for L2TP/IPsec. I step through setting up VPN on the router, and as a bonus how to enable VPN on an iPhone.
  • Opening up port 8080 for speed test socket failure error.

For now though here is part 10:


Part 10: Hardware Offload
The EdgeRouter Lite has several features that can be offloaded to hardware. This significantly increases the throughput of the router. Without Hardware offload the router will pretty much top out around 200Mb/sec or less. Fortunately, it is ON by default allowing the router to perform at pretty much gigabit speed. EdgeOS supports HW offload for:
  • IPv4 forwarding
  • IPv4 vlan
  • IPv4 PPPoE
  • IPv6 forwarding
  • IPv6 vlan
  • IPv6 PPPoE
  • Deep Packet Inspection (DPI which is awesome and we will cover it later)
  • GRE offload support (Generic Routing Encapsulation)

There are a few things that will turn off Hardware offload though. They are as follows:
  • Ethernet Bridging (using ports on the EdgeRouter as a switch)
  • Ethernet Bonding (also called port-channeling by Cisco or trunking by HP)
  • Tunnel encapsulation (GRE offload support is offloaded now though)
  • Quality of Service (QoS)
  • Policy Routing (a MODIFY rule will not disable offload though)
  • Unicast Reverse Path Filtering (uRPF)
  • 5-tuple packet filtering (I think).
  • Netflow
  • Port Mirroring
List courtesy of RPS https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeMA...d/td-p/1223408

For some reason, it may become necessary to turn OFF hardware acceleration (I can’t foresee why, but I am also not some network guy, so take that for what it is worth). If that is the case, you can log in to the CLI and disable it. Here is an example of turning it off:
One note about the CLI. When you type configure you can start changing things and the prompt goes from a $ to a #. After you make changes however they aren't applied to your router until you type commit. Once you type commit they get applied to your router, but they will not stay applied to the router following a reboot unless you actually type save. So the process goes: CONFIGURE(make the change), COMMIT(apply the change), and then SAVE (Save the change). If you commit and don't wish to save simply type EXIT DISCARD (that means you will exit the configure mode and go back to the $ prompt without making any changes).
Quote:

configure
set system offload ipv4 pppoe disable
set system offload ipv4 vlan disable
set system offload ipv4 forwarding disable
commit
save
exit
Here is an example of turning it back on:
Quote:

configure
set system offload ipv4 forwarding enable
commit
save
exit
Note: IPv4 forwarding must be enable in order to enable the other offload features.
https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/artic...-acceleration-



You can verify HW offload is enabled by logging into the CLI and typing
Quote:

show ubnt offload
Here is what I have offloaded for instance


In part 11 we will log into the Web GUI and assign static IPs to our PC and some other stuff. We will also take a look at the traffic analysis deep packet inspection.

Part 11 – Assigning Static IPs with the Web GUI.
In this part we are going to is assign a static IP to our PC using the EdgeOS Web GUI. This is really easy to do via the web GUI, and we need to do it anyway for setting up our VPN and forwarding ports later.
  • Log in to the EdgeOS Web GUI
  • At the top of the page select services
  • Select the Action drop down for the LAN
  • Select View Leases

You should end up with a pop up that looks like this:

Find the IP address that belongs to your PC in the list and select the MAP Static IP button. Another pop up will come up where you can assign it a name of your choice, like “MY PC” or something creative like that and then hit save.
Voila, your PC will now always have that internal IP.
You can view all your static IP selections by clicking the Static MAC/IP Mapping tab in that pop up.


Feel free to assign as many static IPs to things on your network as you like (assuming your on a home network, I don’t see the harm. Then again I know jack about networks so maybe its not a super idea. I do it anyway.

ENABLING DPI
While we are in the GUI go ahead and click the Traffic Analysis Tab.
Click the Radio button on for Operation Status to Enabled
You will get some pop up, just click yes.
This will enable DPI (Deep Packet Inspection) which let’s you drill down to see exactly what each device on your network is doing and how much data they are using.

I refreshed mine so it is only showing generic data at the moment. It will show stuff down to telling you how much data facebook or pinterest or steam is using. Its pretty cool. It also takes advantage of hardware offload, so at least for me it isn’t effecting performance. Later they plan on adding functionality where you can base QoS rules and other crap off of that screen.

SimonCIon Nov 6, 2016 01:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916624)
"As of v1.6.0 EdgeOS now supports hw offload for:

IPv4 forwarding
IPv4 vlan
IPv4 PPPoE
IPv6 forwarding
IPv6 vlan
IPv6 PPPoE"

Except for _maybe_ the PPPoE offloading, that was all supported in EdgeOS 1.2.x. If it hadn't been, then that Tolly report that UBNT commissioned would have been a big fat fabrication. Also, notably absent from that quote is "The default for hw offload has been changed from 'off' to 'on'."

Quote:

Originally Posted by t0adp1p3 (Post 1337916624)
and darn near every single post or review or guide states hardware offload is on by default.

Cool? I'm not sure why you're mentioning that. My ERL shipped with it off. Running the 1.6.0 betas did not turn it on; I had to do that manually. The Ars Technica reviewer who I linked to upthread also got an ERL that shipped with offload off. Plus, you've gone to the trouble to make an entire writeup about manipulating hardware offload. :)

t0adp1p3 Nov 6, 2016 05:42 AM

Not going to turn this into an argument. I accommodated your request to put a section in on how to turn it off and back on. If you have a question about HW offload, you can go to the official UBNT response on the matter whcih shows you how to turn it off:

https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/artic...-acceleration-

guest Nov 6, 2016 01:56 PM

I have this router as well running 1.9

Was easy to setup. My first try was the console I think I had 1.6, the newest at the time. When I put it in use at my house I uploaded to 1.9 and just used the wizard. Pretty damn easy.

Quote:

@ubnt:~$ show version
Version: v1.9.0
Build ID: 4901118
Build on: 08/04/16 11:31
Copyright: 2012-2016 Ubiquiti Networks, Inc.
HW model: EdgeRouter Lite 3-Port

KAC Nov 7, 2016 01:57 AM

What is this Edge router. Sorry, due to me having ADD, I can't possibly read all that is posted in this thread. So TLDR version?

t0adp1p3 Nov 7, 2016 05:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KAC (Post 1337917254)
What is this Edge router. Sorry, due to me having ADD, I can't possibly read all that is posted in this thread. So TLDR version?

It's a non wireless 3 port router that is super reliable (carrier class reliability), can do a million packets per second, runs a pretty powerful OS, and is super cheap. You can do a lot with the router for really cheap and it is supposed to be better than your typical consumer router from Asus, netgear, linksys,etc... The downside is it is only a router, so you still need a switch and wireless access points.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:21 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
All trademarks used are properties of their respective owners. Copyright ©1998-2011 Rage3D.com